Finding Reality

pew-studyThis item grows out of a recent study noting that in the US today few people have friends on the other side of the ideological fence.

It’s easy to imagine how that happens—there are just too many subjects to avoid!   That raises the question of why all those topics are taboo.   There are many reasons, but we deal here with one specific problem:  distinguishing real issues from pretexts.

The problem is that while there are plenty of real policy issues where debate should be possible, they tend to be mixed-in with taboo topics where the policy positions are actually donor’s self-interested pretexts (“climate change is a discredited hoax”).  Public debates can be (and often are) staged to discuss issues in the taboo category, but they never get very far.  There’s not much to be discussed when the stated policy is not the point.

It’s not necessarily easy to figure out what’s real, and undoubtedly many people will disagree with the examples here.   However the idea is to focus on a few issue areas where we as a country ought to be able to make progress if we can keep track of what is real and what isn’t.

We put issues in two categories:  non-issues and real issues.  Non-issues are issues only if donors (or other political considerations) force them to be.    We owe it to the country to get past them.  Real issues are the significant questions we need to solve.

 

  1. Climate change

As just noted, climate change is a poster child for pretexts.  There is of course one primary reason this whole subject is partisan, and his name is Charles Koch.  In addition to the false hoax claim, there is a continually-morphing litany of other misrepresentations.  It used to be easier to be a skeptic.  By now more than enough is known, so that ordinary risk analysis says the time has come to get serious.

Non-issues

Climate change is real.

Burning of fossil fuels is causing it.

The people working on it are not political hacks, but dedicated scientists faced with a hard problem.

Real issues

Risk assessment and what needs to happen now.  Steps and timing.

Roles of government and the private sector, e.g. supporting the power companies.

How research, particularly energy research, can best support the private sector.

What infrastructure changes will be needed and when?  Where will the jobs go?

Coordinating the whole effort.

It is worth pointing out that there are plenty of good, multi-year working-class jobs involved in dealing with climate change.

 

  1. Environmental policy and the EPA

What is frustrating about this topic is the extent to which the whole discussion of environmental regulation has gone on without specifics.   Is it really possible to believe that all environmental regulation is bad?  Even after the Flint disaster?  It is not viable to have environmental regulation whipsawed back and forth between administrations.

Non-issues

Not all environmental regulation is bad.

Not all environmental regulation is bad for business.

Real issues

Agreed-upon standards for regulation.  Work from the current list of Trump administration actions and responses.   Criteria to avoid overreach by all sides.

What is an appropriate process to assure that both the public interest and businesses have a say?

Should there be compensation for consequences of new rules?

 

  1. Healthcare

Now that all the repeal and replace nightmares are out of our system, we really ought to be able to do something good about healthcare.   This isn’t rocket science.   Every other prosperous country has come up with something that works.

Non-issues

Obamacare works well enough to be a starting point.  Sabotaging it helps no one.

The country needs a nationwide solution.  Uniform treatment for all people is good.

Single-payer systems are used by most of the world and may have a role to play.

Real issues

Availability of plans

Cost of plans

Assuring participation and coverage

Addressing needs of businesses

Getting religion out of the debate

Controlling costs of the program

 

  1. Jobs

Thus far the whole treatment of jobs has been based on campaign slogans.  The current tax cut plan is a case in point.   The millions of affected people deserve better.

Non-issues

Decline of good, low-skill working class jobs.

Decline in workforce participation.

Decline of upward mobility in the US.

No silver bullet.

Real issues

What is and isn’t cured by growth.

Workable options for tariffs, subsidies, or other government actions on trade.

Long-standing issues with wage growth and inequality.

Role of education.

Role of government as an employer (e.g. infrastructure, climate projects).

Budget impact and tax plans.

Geographic coverage.

Protecting the next generation.

 

It would be nice to believe that the country is now ready to get down to work.   On real issues some level of bipartisan cooperation could even be the norm.

No Plan

The latest Republican healthcare proposal is such a horror, it is hard to think about anything else.   There is in fact no plan—just a scheme that gives money to the states for them to figure it out.  It is underfunded (the non-participants in Medicaid expansion are now covered too but with overall less money); there is no longer any guarantee of a minimal level of coverage (including for pre-existing conditions); and in the longer term it shuts the door on Medicaid entirely.  It increases the complexity and uncertainty of the system to such a degree even the insurance companies are upset—and it’s not just their problem.   We’re talking about small, more expensive risk pools and significantly greater administrative costs.

Since this level of incompetence is just about unthinkable, one asks how anyone could come up with it.  There are three immediate answers—all bad:  Trump’s pledge to get rid of Obamacare, the proposal’s massive shift of funding from blue states to red, and the simple fact that this is the last chance to pass something before the special 50-vote rule expires September 30.

Let’s focus on the first point—what did Trump voters think they were voting for?   They were told he had a much better, cheaper plan.   After all he was a businessman and great negotiator.  Since the current proposal is no plan, we now know beyond all doubt that what Trump sold was a lie.  That fact by itself is an under-reported outrage.

We need to explore the scope of that outrage.

It’s not just Trump.  The Republicans have been repealing Obamacare for six years.   They clearly never had a plan either, just lies.

It’s not just healthcare. What do Republicans want for the country?

That actually has straightforward answer.  It is slightly different for Trump and the Congress:

– For Trump it is simple:  “What’s good for me is what’s good for the country.”

– For the Congress the target extends only a little wider:  reduce taxes for very rich people.   Based on contributions this is the Koch brothers’ Congress.   The Koch’s political organization (not just their own money) employs 1600 people and has a larger budget than the Republican party itself.  They are the dog wagging the Republican party tail.

What’s the plan for jobs—reduce on taxes on the rich (with no serious look at whether that addresses real problems)

What’s the plan for infrastructure—reduce taxes on the rich (private financing takes infrastructure off the budget and assures spending will go where the money is)

What’s the plan for healthcare—reduce taxes on the rich here too (defund medicaid & push other care to the states with declining funding)

That is the plan.  There is no plan.  Just lies.

Living with the Dark Side

There has been a lot of talk recently about possible Democratic cooperation with Trump.   There is of course little basis to that yet, but it is interesting how quickly we’ve gone from hoping the Republican Party would save us from Trump to the other way around!  With that as motivation it is worth thinking a little more about the players and issues in this game.

First about the choice of evils:

On one hand we have the Republican Party:

– This has become largely a Koch brothers organization.  Low taxes for the very rich is the only real objective.

– Opposed to all social programs (no accident they couldn’t do healthcare).

– Pro-business, but perhaps not completely nuts on economic issues.

– Can find individuals to work with.

On the other hand we have Trump, with two sometimes contradictory impulses:

  1.  Sees everything as though he were still managing his own businesses

– Cut taxes on businesses and rich people

– No interest in unemployed people or other “losers”

– All regulations are bad; anything of value happens in the private sector

  1.  Sold himself as a “populist” and wants to believe he is delivering on it

– Primary focus is jobs via tax cuts and tariffs.  Not much has actually happened.

– Support for coal miners, abandonment of Paris Agreement, killing DACA

– Not much else yet; AHCA would not have been a winner

The business side of Trump is only subtly different from the Koch brothers agenda, and separating Trump’s two sides is tricky.  His speech on exiting the Paris Agreements was all about the populist side, but everything behind it was driven by Koch brothers people (Pruitt, Pence).  Similarly, AHCA was nominally populist, but really an excuse to cut taxes for rich people.

Thus far Trump hasn’t done much for the populist side, but he keeps talking about it.   That’s actually what has thus far stopped healthcare.  Republicans spent six years repealing ACA with no worries about who would lose coverage–but that became an obvious issue now.  Even though Trump supports AHCA, it’s not so easy for Congress just to laugh off the coverage.

Ideally that is an opening to find Democratic proposals of obvious benefit to Trump’s core constituency that are somehow salable to Trump.  We have to accept these will only get mileage if they are presented as Trump’s initiatives.  If it all fails, that will at least point out the hypocrisy of the populism.

There are some obvious possibilities:

  1. Healthcare

Anything here is conditional on Republicans really giving up on the AHCA nightmare. If that happens Trump will need something.  That could conceivably be whatever comes out of the bipartisan work on ACA, but Trump may want something really different to put his name on.

It should be pointed that this is not just an issue for the Trump core.  Business needs it too, even more than the tax cut if you if you believe Warren Buffett.  A good solution here could incorporate elements of a single payer system into a public option based on Medicare.  For that it is important to realize that the existing Medicare infrastructure is actually administrated by the private sector.

This is a low probability, but you never know–he might bite if it really does save money for business.

  1. Infrastructure

Trump has said he wants to do this, but a pure private sector approach won’t work for poor areas.  Appalachia is not going to benefit without some kind of compromise approach.

  1. Transitional job assistance (retraining and support)

Thus far Trump has put all his eggs in the “growth = jobs” basket.  His target budget killed any assistance programs, including a successful one in Appalachia.   However, it is now clear things are going to take longer than he expected.  If this is viewed as transitional, we may actually be able to help people.

  1. Early childhood education; cost of college

All polls I’ve seen of Trump’s base say that they want something better for their children.  Paul Ryan Republicans have been disastrous for such programs.  These would be clear benefits for the working class.

  1. Tax reform

Trump likes to talk about reducing the current 35% corporate income tax.   However, the average effective rate is more like 24 %, in large part because of special provisions delivered by lobbyists for particular corporations.  A lot of Trump support is from small businesses who aren’t so lucky.   A fair system may not appeal to Paul Ryan, but there is more reason for it to appeal to Trump.   No one is supporting 15%, but 25% with real tax reform would not break the bank and would recall an achievement under Reagan.

  1. Promoting American jobs

Trump has made high tariffs the miracle solution to all problems for everyone.   That’s not true, but it doesn’t mean there is nothing sensible to do.   Trump probably doesn’t know anything else.   We may be able to help.  This is not the Republicans’ area of expertise.

  1. Climate Change

This is so crazy it’s hard to give up, even if it means fighting the Koch brothers directly. There’s both a carrot and a stick involved here, with recent developments for both:

– Harvey is the most recent example of what worsening weather can mean.  As noted in the previous post, no reasonable business faced with such a large potential risk would choose just to ignore it.

– The reality of climate change will create enormous business opportunities—wholesale migration to electric cars is just one.  With current policies we could very well cede all that to the Chinese.  This would not be the only time that a first mover like Tesla would lose out in the end.

In all these areas, in contrast to the Republican healthcare fiasco, Democrats should be able to offer real proposals.  So you never know….

Minding the Store

It has been a long time since there was someone interested in governing the United States of America.  For now we are specializing in promotional stunts (essentially all of foreign policy) or deliveries to electoral constituencies (climate change, ACA repeal, white supremacist racism).

Now that we can have no delusions about what Trump represents (pardoning Arpaio was a last straw), the country is in dire need of a way to get through the next 3 ½ years.

So it is worth remembering that there is actually a group in government trying to do something positive for the country.  That is the bipartisan group of senators working to fix problems with Obamacare (e.g. number of plans offered).  Not only is that a laudable activity for itself (whether or not the results get quashed), but it makes you think about other things a bipartisan group could do.   Here is one short list.

– Supreme Court nominees

At this point you don’t have to be a Democrat to recognize that democracy in this country is under threat.  We need to decide that a next Supreme Court justice cannot use the war powers clause or anything else to promote legal tyranny.  That applies to the role of Congress, to delaying or otherwise manipulating elections, and to Presidential pardons.

– Jobs program subsidies

During the election both candidates spoke about a government role in promoting employment in under-served areas (Appalachia, inner cities, etc.).  More recently, Republicans have promoted a deal with Foxcomm that was very heavily subsidized by the state of Wisconsin.

This needs to be a federal program because not all states can do it themselves, because it needs to be planned at a national level, and because a federal program could reduce the leverage employers have in playing off states against each other.

– Infrastructure

This is another area promoted by both candidates in the election.  There are of course significant differences in approach.  But it seems that issues such as selection of projects, rules and roles for private investment, and protection against corruption can be solved if there is a will to do it.

– Taxes

This a controversial area, and Trump’s so-called tax reform is not helpful.   But there is agreement on at least a couple of points:

  1. Real tax reform means eliminating the current maze of special gifts to create a more equitable system and a correspondingly lower basic tax rate. That kind of reform was achieved as a bipartisan effort under Reagan.   It has little to do with proposals currently on the table, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be done.
  2. As part of that effort, there is agreement that the basic corporate tax rate is too high. So that seems a good place to start–when accompanied by item #1.

– Education

Education is one of the most important services provided by government.  Even if De Vos vouchers turn out to be off-limits, there are at least two areas where bipartisan work is possible:

  1. The student loan crisis is a huge burden on a whole generation. This is not because students have suddenly become wasteful in their habits, but because costs of college have risen rapidly even in state institutions.  Government needs to help out.
  2. Government needs to help students and states to navigate the costs and benefits of educational programs. This is not just a matter of fraudulent institutions and sweetheart deals to vendors (although there is plenty of that).   Students need the information to choose for their futures.  And we as a country need to decide what equality of opportunity means for the cost of college.

– Foreign Policy

The only foreign policy we currently have is a disdain for employees of the State Department and a desire to exploit foreign issues for chest-beating electoral gestures.  It is tough to do foreign policy by committee, but we don’t really have a choice.

 

This is by no means a complete list, but we have to recognize that government is in crisis and needs a bipartisan effort even to mind the store.

A Modest Proposal on Healthcare

Seems like we’re making things too hard on healthcare.

Both sides should remember what they really care about:

Republicans have already amply proven that the only part of ACA they care about is the surtax.   They don’t have to keep proving it anymore.  They’d also like to save some money if they can.  They only make a mess when they pretend they want to do healthcare.

Democrats either want ACA to continue in its current form or they want it to evolve to a single payer system.

Further Trump has made this simpler in two ways:

  • His tax proposal greatly diminishes the need for rich people to pay for any part of the federal budget.
  • His budget goes far beyond anything Dick Cheney dreamed of when he said deficits don’t matter.

So the solution is right there before our eyes:

Keep ACA.   If you want to pay for some part of it, put it in the general budget, so rich people get a huge break in any case.

And if you want to save money, go to single payer.

All done.  Everyone can go home happy!